Tired: 2017. Wired: 2017 Raleigh Blowout.

Well, it’s that time of year. Raleigh just made us a very good deal on 2017 RXM, Stuntman, Roker Sport, Tamland 1, and others. So we brought these few specific models in to sell at steep discounts.  Without further ado:

rxm cyclocross gravel

Raleigh RXM 2017

Raleigh RXM $1339 ($1999) 52,54, 56, 58

 

 

tamland gravel

Raleigh Tamland 1 2017

Raleigh Tamland 1 $1339 ($2299) 52, 54, 56, 58, 60

 

 

roker sport

Raleigh Roker Sport 2017

Raleigh Roker Sport $1549 ($2499) sizes 54, 56, 58

 

 

stuntman raleigh

Raleigh Stuntman 2017

Raleigh Stuntman $1549 ($2299) 54, 56, 58

The prices in parentheses are Raleigh’s retail prices. Note that Raleigh frequently changes its retail price on its site, so some may not be reflected here.

Pro tip: call or email ahead to see if we have your size built up. A lot of them are still in boxes!

We also have a bunch of 2017 Salsas to close out. We’ll post about those shortly.

 

New and Noteworthy

We’d like to introduce you to some things we’ve taken into the herd lately. Since we sell only things that we like, we’re excited to show them off. Here goes.

Raleigh Misceo 4.0 i8

Some bikes flaunt themselves and call attention to their fancy components.

And then there are bikes that have the exact same components but that fly under the radar. They might not look like anything different, and in fact you might not notice them at all, much like a too-young fixie rider who prefers to ride without lights.

The new Raleigh Misceo 4.0 i8 is one such bike. So we decided to call some attention to it. Here’s why. With a weatherproof, almost zero-maintenance drivetrain and superior, low-maintenance brakes, the Misceo packs a lot of advanced bike technology into an unassuming package at an extremely low price (given this level of components). It features a Shimano Alfine 8 internally geared hub, which has proven to be extremely reliable and to require very little maintenance. It’s also clean, in that there’s no grease, no gunk, no sharp metal edges. Complimenting this is the Gates Carbon Drive belt system, which replaces a filthy, clothes-chewing chain with a clean, dry, zero-maintenance belt that will last far longer. Thirdly, the Shimano self-adjusting hydraulic disc brakes are about as good as it gets for city riding, especially in rainy weather. They’ll never scratch or groove your rims, either. The tires are wider than you’ll find on road bikes, meaning you’ll have more contact with the pavement for greater stability and control. Fenders, rack,, and water bottle cages go on easily. Add a dynamo lighting system, and you’ll never have to worry about batteries, light theft, or forgetting to remember where your lights are–you just hop on and ride and the lights take care of themselves.  have a perfect all-weather city bike

 

Misceo 4.0 i8Misceo 5.0 b

Raleigh Clubman Disc:

After a 3-year absence, Raleigh has reached back into its past and redesigned their venerable Clubman. Now it has disc brakes. Since all the bikes we carry have disc brakes (yes, that’s our policy), and since we love drop-bar, cromoly roadsters with classic looks, we’re very happy to put this bike where it belongs: on Portland’s streets! As with almost all our bikes, we’re offering a Portlandistan version of the Clubman Disc. That will include a kick-ass dynamo lighting system, a light but very stiff rear rack, and a few other things that make biking in Portland even more of a pleasure than it already is. Arriving end of October 2014.

 

Soma Wolverine frameset and custom builds

Wolverine built Wolverine

Joe's Wolverine

Introducing our complete Soma Wolverines

 

 
 

weltgrinder

After building up a wide variety of Soma Wolverines for a wide variety of customers, we decided to offer complete Wolverines in three flavors. There’s the Daily Grinder, the Gravelo, and the Weltgrinder Rohloff. If you guessed these are optimized for commuting, gravel, and touring, you’re right.

The Wolverine is now available in a flat black as well as the orange. It’s also now available in size 62, though at the moment quantities are very limited.

The Wolverine Daily Grinder, shown below, is a belt-drive, Alfine-8 commuter with hydraulic disc brakes. The semi-sweptback handlebars give you a moderately upright posture that make the ride sublime. It really is a different, calmer experience than riding the same bike with flat bars. (If you want flat bars, though, we won’t “steer” you away.)

Wolverine Daily Grinder Coffee Grinder2

 

IMG_5557

Black Wolverine Daily Grinder

Black Wolverine Daily Grinder IMG_5556

Below is Joe’s personal Wolverine, featuring a triple crankset for trailer-towing duty, a complete dynamo system, Joe Bike Most Sexiest hammered copper fenders, a Soma porteur rack, Brooks saddle, and leather grips.

Joe's Wolverine

 

The  Wolverine Gravelo is our 29er gravel and adventure build featuring flaired drop bars or Jones Loop bars, high-volume tires, a 2×10 Tiagra or Apex drivetrain, and BB7 mechanical disc brakes.

Gravel Grando wolv grav 2 wolv grav

Here’s a Gravelo with Jones Loop handlebars.Gravel Grando Mr Jones

The Wolverine Weltgrinder Rohloff

The Weltgrinder Rohloff is our continent-crosser. Featuring a Rohloff 14-speed hub, belt drive, Jones Loop bars, TRP HyRd hydromechanical disc brakes, front and rear heavy-duty racks, a SON Schmidt dynamo hub, a phone-charging Busch & Mueller Luxos U head light, and a Busch & Mueller tail light. (Note: the V2 version of the frame, which is what we carry, has received the Rohloff/Gates seal of approval.)

weltgrinder 2  wolvie chris king wolvie luxos wolvie rohloff

schmidt wolvie

 

Want more examples? Okay.

Chris's Wolverine

Chris’s Wolverine. Those are Casey’s Crazy Bars wrapped in Brooks tape, along with PDW leather grips and a Selle Anatomica leather saddle. The drivetrain is Rohloff/belt, which is something to be discussed before entering into. Shutter Precision/Supernova dynamo system, BB7 brakes, Schwalbe Marathons.

 

An example of a city build, in this case the city being New York. Alfine 8, belt drive, BB7 disc brakes, FSA Metropolis bars for a more upright right, Axiom Streamliner Disc DLX rack, SKS RaceBlade detachable fenders, and 35 mm Michelin Protek Max tires.

An example of a city build, in this case the city being New York. Alfine 8, belt drive, BB7 disc brakes, FSA Metropolis bars for a more upright right, Axiom Streamliner Disc DLX rack, SKS RaceBlade detachable fenders, and 35 mm Michelin Protek Max tires.

Wolverine drop

Singlespeed build with belt drive. Steerer tube is left uncut til the customer decides the best height.

Here find more narrative direct from Soma:

The original inspiration for the Wolverine was “monster cross”, but it is seriously so much more. Its geometry is stable enough for off road touring, but sporty enough for all-around adventure. With its Tange/IRD Split Sliding Dropouts, you can turn it into a single-speed CX bike. Plus it is compatible with the Gates Carbon Drive.
– Tange Prestige heat-treated CrMo front triangle; butted CrMo rear end
– Clearance for 700x45c tires w/ fenders
– Rear hub spacing: 135mm
– Gates Carbon belt drive compatible
– Matching lugged flat crown fork Tange Infinity CrMo steel fork; double eyelets pannier rack and mini rack mounts (mini rack mounts not pictured)
– Braze-ons for rear rack and fenders (disc brake-compatible racks only)
– 1-1/8″ size headtube
– Sizes: 50, 52, 54, 56, 58cm,  60
– 4.79 lbs (frame); 2.3 lbs. (fork, uncut steerer)
– Color: Pumpkin Orange – Compatible with Paragon Machine Works replacement dropouts (Rohloff, Single Speed, Direct Mount, Thru Axle)

 

 

 

 

B&M Lumotec IQ-X

A new champ among dynamo lights: the Busch & Mueller Lumotec IQ-X

 

Busch & Mueller have outdone their top-of-the-line Luxos headlights with the 100 lux IQ-X. This is the most powerful dynamo headlight we know of.

iq-xHere’s the IQ-X at 100 lux…

…and below is the B&M Cyo Premium at 80 lux.

Cyo Premium at 80 lux

 

…and below you’ll see all the 10-lux increments of the IQ-X:

10 to 100 lux

The IQ-X’s new optical system produces a smoother distribution of light on the road than any other headlight. You can set the light to the power that you want, ranging from 10 to 100 lux in 10-lux increments. How does 100 lux translate into lumens? From a cyclist’s perspective, there is no translation. Lumens describes the amount of light produced, whereas lux describes the amount or intensity of light thrown upon a given area at a given distance. From a cyclist’s perspective, lux is a much more meaningful indicator of a light’s usefulness. For more, see this Urban Velo post.

The housing is anodized aluminum and acts as the heat sink for the LED.

IQ-X__schwarz__schraeg_hinten

The IQ-X has a standing light (like all the B&M lights we carry), as well as daytime running lights. A senso automatically switches to either daytime or nighttime mode. It does not have a blinking mode, and that’s good, because a blinking light this powerful would be extremely annoying, not to mention dangerous, to oncoming traffic. Mounting: compatible with other Busch & Müller headlight mounts. The included mount will work on most bikes. As with other B&M headlights, it includes wiring for a tail light.

IQ-X__silber__schraeg_hinten

The sleek appearance of the IQ-X is also a big step forward for Busch & Mueller.

IQ-X is $146, less expensive than the Luxos B!

iq-x silver wolverine

We hope B&M will offer a USB port version of the IQ-X that, like the Luxos U, lets you charge phones, cameras, and other devices while you pedal.

iq-x wolverine

We keep both black and silver in stock whenever possible. They can be purchased online, tax-free, at our online store.

 

We review the Salsa Bucksaw full-suspension fatbike

bucksaw 1Until now, sand and snow were the surfaces that hardtail fatbikes were designed for. Despite attempts to create a more trailworthy fatbike geometry, most fell far short of that and retained the heavy, slow handling and limited acceleration that defined the category as a whole. Salsa, as usual in the forefront of inventive engineering and genre creation, clearly wasn’t willing to take that as an answer. They designed a full-suspension fatbike that eats terrain you’ve always thought was unrideable.

At first the Bucksaw is aesthetically confusing. The frame looks like a quick and racy short-travel XC Split Pivot dual-suspension design. But then you take in the 3.8” wide tires, drilled out (to save weight) fatbike rims, and mammoth fork, and you realize it’s a fatbike. The only way to deal with the resulting cognitive dissonance is to take this mutant out for a ride boldy, where no one has gone before. You might spend the next few days with Google Earth, reconsider all of the terrain you know, all over the world, with the understanding that now you can probably ride it.

Bucksaw_2_15_34f_1440x960

Salsa Bucksaw 2, $3999

This thing eats trail. Seriously, any kind of trail you ride, this bike loves it. It climbs, it descends, it carves impossible corners, it flies over gaps, you don’t even -notice- most obstacles at all, all the while hooking up with whatever the terrain is and churning out mile after mile of nirvana-level bliss. In fact, the only real caveat is that the bike is so capable, you could find yourself riding beyond your skill and if things get truly hairy you might eat some of that lovely singletrack you had been blasting through moments before. The only thing this bike can’t do is make appropriate judgement calls about your physical (and mental) safety and abilities, so keep it dialed back for the first few rides until you know what you can get away with. A full-face helmet with MIPS would be a good idea, even for skilled riders. Safety first, and you only have one brain.

So here’s how it works. Most full suspension frames use the fork and rear suspension unit to do two things: small bump compliance and large bump compliance. The physics of those two things are very different, and suspension manufacturers have gotten fancier and fancier every year, designing dual air chambers and different valve flow rates and such to get good responsiveness for both. It’s almost always something of a compromise, though; as the small bump compliance improves, the suspension overall gets mushier; as the large bump compliance improves, the suspension has a higher force requirement to trigger it, so you start to feel smaller bumps. The suspension units that do both well are expensive and have more complicated, and therefore delicate, internals. The Bucksaw uses the huge tire volume and ridiculously low tire pressure to take care of the small bump compliance, and the suspension is primarily tuned for excellent large bump compliance. That, combined with the vast confidence-inspiring traction you get thanks to the huge contact patch of the tires, makes for a super smooth, super fast ride. And also a really addictive one.

 

To get into the really nitty gritty, let’s start with all the usual suspects. The frame is mechanically formed AL-6066 series aluminum with carbon fiber seatstays. The Bucksaw has a tapered head-tube/steerer tube with a Cane Creek 10 ZS 44/56 sealed cartridge bearing headset. The RockShox Bluto 100mm travel fork uses a 15mm thruaxle for stiffness and superior hub retention. It’s paired with the RockShox Monarch RT3 rear suspension unit, and the aforementioned Split Pivot (™) suspension design. Quick aside: Split Pivot is a mechanism that puts the rear-most pivot concentric to the rear axle, which has the main effect of removing both acceleration and braking forces from the suspension input, making the bike feel stiffer under pedaling load and preventing the suspension from compressing while engaging the rear brake. In short, it’s a massive improvement over pretty much most other full frame suspension designs and a lot of high quality dual suspension manufacturers license the patent. Moving on: the Bucksaw 2 (gold; the one we’re stocking) has predominantly SRAM components hanging off of it; X9 Type 2 rear derailleur, X7 HDM 10 speed front derailleur, 1030 10 speed 11-36 cassette, X5 Fat Bike specific 34/22 crankset, X9 BB 2×10 shifters, SRAM Guide hydraulic disc brakes with 180mm rotors front and rear. The wheelset is constructed from the Salsa Conversion fat bike hubs, 150mm front with 15mm thruaxle, 177mm rear with 12mm thruaxle, Salsa Marge Lite 65mm drilled rims, and Surly Nate 26” x 3.8” 120 tpi folding bead tires. Everything else is pretty basic. A Salsa stem, a WTB saddle, a Truvativ seatpost; all good quality but inexpensive enough that it won’t hurt your soul to replace it with something different if you have strong preferences for those items.

The Bucksaw 1 has the same frame, different paint, and nicer parts: a Thomson stem, a RockShox Reverb dropper seatpost, SRAM 1×11 (30t ring x 10-42 cassette) drivetrain, and Guide RS hydraulic brakes, but the same fork, rear suspension, wheels/tires, and so on. The Bucksaw 1 weighs in, without pedals, at a thoroughly impressive 36 lbs 6 oz for the Medium frame.


At $3,999 for the 2 and $4,999 for the 1, we’re not talking entry-level mountain bike tech here. This stuff is not for the weekend warrior or mountain bike wannabe. If you get this bike, you are invested. You believe, not just in mountain biking, but in the validity and future of fat bikes as mountain bikes, not just sand and snow bikes, and you are excited, nay, you are delirious with joy, that someone else out there feels the same way, and moreover that someone (really, someones, this was very much a team effort) invested the time, the passion, the knowledge, the money, and the love, into bringing this bike into the world. You will not be disappointed.

 

 

Unclear on the concept: “Who needs a belt when there’s a full metal chaincase?”

We’ve been confronted with this question and have decided to answer it publicly. The question was, “Really, who needs a belt when there’s a full metal chaincase” on my shiny, expensive new bike?

Translation: why would I want belt drive when I can enclose my steel chain in an assembly of several metal pieces that are bolted together and that must be at least partially removed to do most drivetrain maintenance or just to fix a flat?

Steel chaincase in all its pieces. (Screws not shown.)

Steel chaincase in all its pieces. (Screws not shown.)

We laughed, we sighed, we wanted to cry but the tears just wouldn’t come out.

Here’s what to consider.

First: ever try changing a rear flat tire for a bike that has a full chaincase? If yes, then you understand how much longer it takes to complete the task, and what a pain in the ass it is. What should normally take no more than 10 or 15 minutes will take maybe 45. Even (or especially) mechanics gripe about this. In fact, we added a $30 surcharge, on top of our usual $8 flat repair, for bikes with full chaincases.

It’s true, the chaincase will keep the chain cleaner for longer, seeing as how it’s protected inside a suit of armor, but nonetheless moisture will collect there, oiling is still necessary, and maintenance remains key.

ajax nice

A Tout Terrain Via Veneto with Gates Carbon Drive. No chainguard because no chain. No belt guard because no need for one.

With a belt, you don’t need a suit of armor because the belt can’t rust, doesn’t get greasy, and won’t eat your pants*. Lighter, cleaner, quieter than a chain, with basically no maintenance and at least twice the life of a chain. In modest city riding (as opposed to racing), that belt will last tens of thousands of miles. Flat changes are gunk-free, quick, and clean. With most belt-drive bikes now, there’s no need to retension the belt when reinstalling the wheel.

*Some manufacturers do include a minimal, one-piece guard for the belt ring, which is more psychological than functional.

belt drive

Smoother cleaner lighter more durable easier to work with and no appetite for clothing.

The downside? The belt costs more, as does a belt-specific drivetrain in general. But in the long run you earn your money back in time and maintenance costs. The only other downside is that bike frames need to be designed to accept a belt. This adds a whopping $30 or so to the cost of a frame, and a belt-specific drivetrain will add typically about $200 to the cost of the complete bike. The fact is, most manufacturers haven’t taken that step. Yet.

So. That steel chaincase? Recycling bin. Belt drive is a smarter choice.

 

 

 

 

clubman touring

We review the new Raleigh Clubman Disc

Under new Dutch ownership, the resurgent Raleigh has redesigned one of its classics, the Clubman light tourer, to include disc brakes, making it that much better for Portland riders while upsetting a few crusties who like 1970s brake technology just the way it was*.

Raleigh has preserved the old, genteel aesthetic that is the heart and soul of the Clubman. Sporty but not twitchy, comfy but not slow, the Clubman is the road bike for those who appreciate (and revel in) the difference between competitive road racing and spirited road riding. Century rides, solo or in a group? Absolutely. McKenzie Pass? Do it. Light touring? Check! Multnomah Falls? Wait, we’ll join you. Commute? Heck yeah. Keep it mostly to the pavement, and this bike will rock your world.

clubman disc touring 3It’s the thoughtful details that really make the Clubman a treasure. Of course it has a built-in peg under the top tube for your Zefal frame pump. It also has an integrated, lugged seatpost collar and cowled Ritchey-style rear dropouts. The fork is slender and yet robust, with an elegantly brazed crown. All the bits and pieces are silver, and mostly polished silver, evoking a bygone era of hand-selected and hand-polished components, craftsman assembly, and personal attention to detail. Even the saddle is special: it’s riveted and covered in a deep-blue suede. The metal fenders are even painted to match the accent stripes, which is almost unheard of these days.

The drivetrain takes advantage of trickle-down technology: Shimano’s Hollowtech II two-piece crankset now exists in the affordable and high bang-to-buck ratio Tiagra groupset. Two-piece cranks use large-diameter bearings outside the shell of the frame to improve bearing life and durability, as well as stiffness under load. Shimano’s integrated STI brake/shift levers have great ergonomics and quick, crisp shifting. The newer Tiagra road rear derailleur has a wider accessible gear range than in the past, and is paired with a new 12-30 10-speed cassette that bridges the road and mountain gearing worlds. Even the front derailleur is seeing improvements from its more expensive counterparts in the form of a wider, stiffer linkage, resulting in superior shifts with less clattering or hesitation. Shimano’s mechanical road disc brakes have independent pad adjustments for each disc pad, and an improved, beefier actuation arm for less flex under strong braking forces.

In short, this bike has all the class and style of a high-end road touriste from the 1970s, and all the functionality and quality of modern components and manufacturing. Customize it with a dynamo hub and lights, or outfit it with a handlebar bag and panniers, or class it up with a leather saddle and leather bar tape.

$1100, in stock. Butted cromoly frame, cromoly fork. Shimano BR-R317 mechanical disc brakes, Tiagra 2 x 10 drivetrain. Sizes: 52, 54, 56, 58, 60, 62. We regret to inform you that 52cm is the smallest size, most likely because of toe vs tire interference while turning , sometimes an issue with very small frames.

Clubman Disc set up for light touring. Shown with Portland-made North St. bags on an Axiom Streamliner Disc DLX rack. Front bag: Axiom Joliet DLX 8.8L. Portland-made wooden bottle cage from Sykes Wood Fenders.

Clubman Disc set up for light touring. Shown with Portland-made North St. bags on an Axiom Streamliner Disc DLX rack. Front bag: Axiom Joliet DLX 8.8L. Portland-made wooden bottle cage from Sykes Wood Fenders. Frame pump: Axiom BlastAir HVL.

 

Specs and sizing information.

clubman disc 2*You probably already know this, but all the bikes we sell have disc brakes. We’re still asked why, too. Disc brakes stop you better especially in the rain and require a lot less maintenance. This can be discussed for hours, but that’s it, distilled into a single drop.

 

 

wazee2

Our prayers have been answered in the form of steel. Introducing the Spot Brand Wazee.

Spot Brand WazeeSpot pretty much answered our prayers when they decided to make the Wazee, an all-cromoly urban bike with Carbon Drive, Alfine 11, disc brakes, and Schwalbe tires. Urban bikesTheir copy for this bike has a lot of history and geography to it, so we’re going to let Spot do the narrative on this one, pasted in below. But first the basic facts: $2199, available late August, preordering now with 60% down, sizes 49, 52, 55, 57, 60. Geometry and specs. Good with racks (front and rear), fenders, kickstands. Our customizations can include dynamo systems, drop bars or other bars, and many other variations. Now on to the story and the history:Spot Wazee wazee 3Style, Precision and Panache In the spirit of Colin Chapman, the brash auto racing entrepreneur who created the Lotus 38 that won the 1965 Indy 500, we present the Wazee—a city bike that blends modern technology with retro racing aesthetics. The sleek and streamlined steel frame delivers the classic ride characteristics and road-feel that bicyclists prize. wazee 5And with its Lotus-inspired Chapman green (of course) color scheme, the Wazee handles city streets with precision and panache. Our Wazee is the newest member of the Spot family but its heritage runs deep. Wazee Street is one of Denver’s most storied thoroughfares, the epicenter of LoDo and beating heart of Mile-High commerce and culture. Anchoring the bike is the most innovative drive system available: a CenterTrack belt drive that motors fast and quiet, lap after lap after lap. Colin Chapman would be proud.Spot Wazee

You’re invited to our grand opening/5-year anniversary party this Friday.

Party July 12

Joe Bike started by accident five years ago in a postsurgical narcotic haze. We probably shouldn’t have made it, but we did, thanks to this incredible community. So this party’s for you. Come spill some wine with us at our new, infinitely nicer location on the Lincoln Ave bike boulevard. Food from Portobello Vegan Trattoria and Rovente pizza will be provided. Drinks and pretty lights will be waiting for you too. Families are of course welcome.

This is also sort of a kickoff party for the following day’s Disaster Relief Trials. Anybody associated with that event should get here! To learn more about Saturday’s DRT event, which is also a cargo bike exhibition, go here.

Our party is not to be used for the demo or selling of bikes!

Parking: if you’re driving, please avoid parking in our building’s parking lot, because these are prime ours for our restaurant neighbor. Please park on the street. Bike parking: This is going to be a challenge. There will probably be a dense line along the picket fence on the west side of the driveway.

We started a Facebook event where you can RSVP if you like.